Saturday, January 29, 2011

The Stand by Stephen King, Padfoot's Lament


Ok first, I just want to say, please do not toilet paper my house or put my hand in warm water or anything you crazy kids do these days. But just be prepared, The Stand lovers, to hear my severe disappointment with the book.


**********WARNING SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS**************



First, a short synopsis of the plot:

A super-virus created by the government is accidently released by one of its employees. About 99% of the entire population is wiped out, and the remaining survivors are brought together by similar dreams of an old black lady. They eventually meet in Boulder, Colorado, and begin to rebuild their lives. At the same time, they’ve been having dreams about a “dark man” who is building his empire in Las Vegas. There is a gradual split between the survivors, into “good” and “evil” groups. The rest of the novel is a showdown between these two groups, and it all ends with a bang.


I have had at least a million people recommend this book to me. Wait, not really recommend, but something more dramatic like “READ THIS BOOK YOU WILL LOVE IT FOREVER.” Also known as the best Stephen King novel of all time.

Well…I don’t get it.


The first 200-300 pages were EXCELLENT! I loved the eeriness of the plague, the wonder of “what is this, what the hell is going on?” But that just seemed to be ruined when the dreams came into play. The whole religious theme just didn’t seem to fit. I think it should have gone in another direction…

And the ending?!? Don’t even get me started…


That’s all I have to say right now; this isn’t really a review but a discussion. I want to hear some of your thoughts, let’s discuss amongst ourselves!


-mischief managed-

The Stand by Stephen King, Padfoot's Lament


Ok first, I just want to say, please do not toilet paper my house or put my hand in warm water or anything you crazy kids do these days. But just be prepared, The Stand lovers, to hear my severe disappointment with the book.


**********WARNING SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS**************



First, a short synopsis of the plot:

A super-virus created by the government is accidently released by one of its employees. About 99% of the entire population is wiped out, and the remaining survivors are brought together by similar dreams of an old black lady. They eventually meet in Boulder, Colorado, and begin to rebuild their lives. At the same time, they’ve been having dreams about a “dark man” who is building his empire in Las Vegas. There is a gradual split between the survivors, into “good” and “evil” groups. The rest of the novel is a showdown between these two groups, and it all ends with a bang.


I have had at least a million people recommend this book to me. Wait, not really recommend, but something more dramatic like “READ THIS BOOK YOU WILL LOVE IT FOREVER.” Also known as the best Stephen King novel of all time.

Well…I don’t get it.


The first 200-300 pages were EXCELLENT! I loved the eeriness of the plague, the wonder of “what is this, what the hell is going on?” But that just seemed to be ruined when the dreams came into play. The whole religious theme just didn’t seem to fit. I think it should have gone in another direction…

And the ending?!? Don’t even get me started…


That’s all I have to say right now; this isn’t really a review but a discussion. I want to hear some of your thoughts, let’s discuss amongst ourselves!


-mischief managed-

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Prong's 21st Review : Death Note


Hey there Marauders.

Prongs here brining you a review of my ‘Wild Card’ for Collections/Graphic novels. Since week 3’s reading (My Mother She Killed Me, My Father he Ate Me) was going a bit slow, I decided to pick up a graphic novel I have been ITCHING to get my hands on.

I own and am reviewing the ‘Black Edition’ from B&N, which contains Volumes 1& 2 of the series. Sadly, the other Black Editions are only available for pre-order and I will have to wait until May for more of the story. There are 7 Black Editions in all… aka. 14 volumes. The Death Note series was published between 2003 and 2006 in Japan, and has since spawned a TV series, multiple novel spin offs, and a full-length movie.

So now that you have a bit of back info… here is Prong’s short-but loving review of the new cult hit ‘Death Note’.

"I'm going to change the world."

Death Note

Story by Tsugumi Ohba Art by Takeshi Obata

Have you ever heard the old philosophical debate of how we know whether man is truly good or evil at heart? The argument goes something like ‘imagine you could be invisible for a day… what is the first thing you would do?’ For most people, the first thing that comes to mind is usually something not quite moral… a.k.a. spy on Mike Rowe in the shower. This concept is put to the test in ‘Death Note’ when high-school student Light Yagami discovers an abandoned supernatural notebook belonging to none other than the ‘death god’ Ryuk.

When Light comes into possession of the notebook, he also inherits the sinisteryet cataclysmic powers that come with being a ‘death god’. By simply writing the full name of someone and imagining their face, Light is able to cause the instantaneous fatality of any human of his choosing… thus making him a master of death, of good and evil. It isn’t long before Light, a highly intelligent and moral student begins a crusade to rid the world of evil by ending the lives of known criminals in mass. Since no one besides Light and the death god Ryuk know about the details of how the Death Note works, society is thrown into chaos as a seemingly benevolent crusader begins mystically taking down criminals one by one. Many dub this unknown dictator of death as 'Kira', and Light must work tirelessly to keep his true identity a secret.

As the story progresses, unknown aspects of the Death Note's powers begin to emerge, along with new challenges for Light to deal with, all while trying to remain a top student and honorable son. One of those aspects is the presence of Ryuk, the death god that only the possessor of the Death Note can see. Light continues his daily life with the invisible, but not silent presence of the frighteningly funny death god following his every step. Ironically enough, Ryuk's unnerving presence provides the comic relief for an otherwise truly dark story.

Issues of judgment and righteousness and who can decide that those words truly mean are obviously huge undertones of the story. As a teenage boy sets out to turn the world into a utopia, it becomes clear that not everyone is as supportive of Light’s idealistic exploits. Light's morality is tested further with the introduction of the mysterious 'L'; a secretive opposer of 'Kira' who seems to be Light's mental match in every way.

Apart from being a compelling story, the very nature of a graphic novel adds to this story in a way that print alone could not accomplish. With out the visuals the book provides, it might be easy to forget that behind this seemingly harmless high school student, lurks an evil force aiding our hero in his fatal quest. Some of my favorite scenes involve Light in a casual conversation with friends, while Ryuk hangs invisible just behind, not letting you forget even in quiet times the power that Light possesses.

While my experience with Manga is limited, I can safely say this is some of the more visually stunning art I have seen in a long time; couple that with a gripping story and it is obvious to see why Death Note became a sensation.


I am also including a bit of a tutorial for how to read Manga for anyone who has yet to discover this fascinating and beautiful genre.


As a reader, I am always looking for ways to expand my concept of ‘a novel’ and my definition of ‘literature’. I am so glad that I stepped outside of my comfort zonewith this work, and look forward to seeing where Light’s adventures will take him next. I HIGHLY and I mean HIGHLY suggest picking this one up.

Prong's 21st Review : Death Note


Hey there Marauders.

Prongs here brining you a review of my ‘Wild Card’ for Collections/Graphic novels. Since week 3’s reading (My Mother She Killed Me, My Father he Ate Me) was going a bit slow, I decided to pick up a graphic novel I have been ITCHING to get my hands on.

I own and am reviewing the ‘Black Edition’ from B&N, which contains Volumes 1& 2 of the series. Sadly, the other Black Editions are only available for pre-order and I will have to wait until May for more of the story. There are 7 Black Editions in all… aka. 14 volumes. The Death Note series was published between 2003 and 2006 in Japan, and has since spawned a TV series, multiple novel spin offs, and a full-length movie.

So now that you have a bit of back info… here is Prong’s short-but loving review of the new cult hit ‘Death Note’.

"I'm going to change the world."

Death Note

Story by Tsugumi Ohba Art by Takeshi Obata

Have you ever heard the old philosophical debate of how we know whether man is truly good or evil at heart? The argument goes something like ‘imagine you could be invisible for a day… what is the first thing you would do?’ For most people, the first thing that comes to mind is usually something not quite moral… a.k.a. spy on Mike Rowe in the shower. This concept is put to the test in ‘Death Note’ when high-school student Light Yagami discovers an abandoned supernatural notebook belonging to none other than the ‘death god’ Ryuk.

When Light comes into possession of the notebook, he also inherits the sinisteryet cataclysmic powers that come with being a ‘death god’. By simply writing the full name of someone and imagining their face, Light is able to cause the instantaneous fatality of any human of his choosing… thus making him a master of death, of good and evil. It isn’t long before Light, a highly intelligent and moral student begins a crusade to rid the world of evil by ending the lives of known criminals in mass. Since no one besides Light and the death god Ryuk know about the details of how the Death Note works, society is thrown into chaos as a seemingly benevolent crusader begins mystically taking down criminals one by one. Many dub this unknown dictator of death as 'Kira', and Light must work tirelessly to keep his true identity a secret.

As the story progresses, unknown aspects of the Death Note's powers begin to emerge, along with new challenges for Light to deal with, all while trying to remain a top student and honorable son. One of those aspects is the presence of Ryuk, the death god that only the possessor of the Death Note can see. Light continues his daily life with the invisible, but not silent presence of the frighteningly funny death god following his every step. Ironically enough, Ryuk's unnerving presence provides the comic relief for an otherwise truly dark story.

Issues of judgment and righteousness and who can decide that those words truly mean are obviously huge undertones of the story. As a teenage boy sets out to turn the world into a utopia, it becomes clear that not everyone is as supportive of Light’s idealistic exploits. Light's morality is tested further with the introduction of the mysterious 'L'; a secretive opposer of 'Kira' who seems to be Light's mental match in every way.

Apart from being a compelling story, the very nature of a graphic novel adds to this story in a way that print alone could not accomplish. With out the visuals the book provides, it might be easy to forget that behind this seemingly harmless high school student, lurks an evil force aiding our hero in his fatal quest. Some of my favorite scenes involve Light in a casual conversation with friends, while Ryuk hangs invisible just behind, not letting you forget even in quiet times the power that Light possesses.

While my experience with Manga is limited, I can safely say this is some of the more visually stunning art I have seen in a long time; couple that with a gripping story and it is obvious to see why Death Note became a sensation.


I am also including a bit of a tutorial for how to read Manga for anyone who has yet to discover this fascinating and beautiful genre.


As a reader, I am always looking for ways to expand my concept of ‘a novel’ and my definition of ‘literature’. I am so glad that I stepped outside of my comfort zonewith this work, and look forward to seeing where Light’s adventures will take him next. I HIGHLY and I mean HIGHLY suggest picking this one up.

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Tattoo Tuesday

Hey there Marauders!! It's our favorite time of the week once again!!
For those of you who are new to the site here's a bit of background. Tattoo Tuesday was started by our good friend Tara over at 25HourBooks and celebrates our love of literature plus the people like us who are obsessed enough to ink something literary on their body! Every week we feature a literary tattoo that interests or compels us. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ink.

This lovely tattoo was found somewhere in the world of Tumbler.


Don't worry readers, this is just a prelude to tomorrow's review of Death Note by the lovely Prongs! To see why this series would be worth tattooing on your body make sure to stop back tomorrow!

Alright folks, that is all for this Tuesday. Don't be too remiss, for we will return next and every Tuesday with a brand new literary tattoo for your viewing pleasure. We encourage every one to check out Tara's site as well, or even feel free to send us an e-mail with any tattoo's of your own!

Tattoo Tuesday

Hey there Marauders!! It's our favorite time of the week once again!!
For those of you who are new to the site here's a bit of background. Tattoo Tuesday was started by our good friend Tara over at 25HourBooks and celebrates our love of literature plus the people like us who are obsessed enough to ink something literary on their body! Every week we feature a literary tattoo that interests or compels us. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ink.

This lovely tattoo was found somewhere in the world of Tumbler.


Don't worry readers, this is just a prelude to tomorrow's review of Death Note by the lovely Prongs! To see why this series would be worth tattooing on your body make sure to stop back tomorrow!

Alright folks, that is all for this Tuesday. Don't be too remiss, for we will return next and every Tuesday with a brand new literary tattoo for your viewing pleasure. We encourage every one to check out Tara's site as well, or even feel free to send us an e-mail with any tattoo's of your own!

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Tattoo Tuesday

Hey there Marauders!! It's our favorite time of the week once again!!
For those of you who are new to the site here's a bit of background. Tattoo Tuesday was started by our good friend Tara over at 25HourBooks and celebrates our love of literature plus the people like us who are obsessed enough to ink something literary on their body! Every week we feature a literary tattoo that interests or compels us. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ink.

This week we have a tattoo from Sophia, from Contrariwise. It is from Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.




What a delightful little phrase!


Alright folks, that is all for this Tuesday. Don't be too remiss, for we will return next and every Tuesday with a brand new literary tattoo for your viewing pleasure. We encourage every one to check out Tara's site as well, or even feel free to send us an e-mail with any tattoo's of your own!

Tattoo Tuesday

Hey there Marauders!! It's our favorite time of the week once again!!
For those of you who are new to the site here's a bit of background. Tattoo Tuesday was started by our good friend Tara over at 25HourBooks and celebrates our love of literature plus the people like us who are obsessed enough to ink something literary on their body! Every week we feature a literary tattoo that interests or compels us. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ink.

This week we have a tattoo from Sophia, from Contrariwise. It is from Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.




What a delightful little phrase!


Alright folks, that is all for this Tuesday. Don't be too remiss, for we will return next and every Tuesday with a brand new literary tattoo for your viewing pleasure. We encourage every one to check out Tara's site as well, or even feel free to send us an e-mail with any tattoo's of your own!

Saturday, January 15, 2011

Padfoot and Prongs: the story of a bookshelf


Hey there Marauders!

Padfoot and Prongs here bringing you a quick post to make your Saturday a little more literary.
We bring to you the epic tale of Padfoot & Prongs and the Bookshelf: An underdog story.

Once upon a friday, a young Marauder had the idea to organize the intense chaos that has become her books in her apartment. The task seemed insurmountable as books laid scattered in closets, on night stands, even in bathrooms.

However all was not lost for Padfoot and Prongs were Marauders of the best kind, and braved a harrowing trip to Wal-Mart to aid them in their quest of organizing books.

Sadly... all of those readins of books doesn't translate to being able to read assembly directions since this was their result....

Just in case it's hard to see.... yeaa that's the bottom shelf.... upside down. I don't know why they don't mention more things like this happening in epic tales... since I'm sure it probably does.

But alas! An idea was had... a way to transform the bookshelf from a sad ugly duckling... to a beautiful sturdy bookshelf-swan that literary folk from far and wide would envy.

That is when Prong's had the idea to incorperate the 'Postcards from Penguin' that
have been sitting untouched in her quarters for so long.





Thus, for many diligent hours P&P sat toiling away with their scissors and rubber cement, pouring their blood sweat in tears into the final outcome.

Their result..... VICTORY!!


An upside-down bottom shelf was defeated, and Prongs now has a bookshelf that she will no longer be ashamed to show her fellow companions!!

The end....

Padfoot and Prongs: the story of a bookshelf


Hey there Marauders!

Padfoot and Prongs here bringing you a quick post to make your Saturday a little more literary.
We bring to you the epic tale of Padfoot & Prongs and the Bookshelf: An underdog story.

Once upon a friday, a young Marauder had the idea to organize the intense chaos that has become her books in her apartment. The task seemed insurmountable as books laid scattered in closets, on night stands, even in bathrooms.

However all was not lost for Padfoot and Prongs were Marauders of the best kind, and braved a harrowing trip to Wal-Mart to aid them in their quest of organizing books.

Sadly... all of those readins of books doesn't translate to being able to read assembly directions since this was their result....

Just in case it's hard to see.... yeaa that's the bottom shelf.... upside down. I don't know why they don't mention more things like this happening in epic tales... since I'm sure it probably does.

But alas! An idea was had... a way to transform the bookshelf from a sad ugly duckling... to a beautiful sturdy bookshelf-swan that literary folk from far and wide would envy.

That is when Prong's had the idea to incorperate the 'Postcards from Penguin' that
have been sitting untouched in her quarters for so long.





Thus, for many diligent hours P&P sat toiling away with their scissors and rubber cement, pouring their blood sweat in tears into the final outcome.

Their result..... VICTORY!!


An upside-down bottom shelf was defeated, and Prongs now has a bookshelf that she will no longer be ashamed to show her fellow companions!!

The end....

Friday, January 14, 2011

Prongs 20th Review : The Blind Assassin

"He was deciding whether to cut her throat or love her forever. Right. Yes. The usual choices."

The Blind Assassin
Margaret Atwood

As a part of my ’52 books’ project for 2011, I am determined to read titles by authors that I am frankly embarrassed I have never made it too. Margaret Atwood was high up on that list, so I was beyond excited when ‘The Blind Assassin’ was drawn as my first book of the year. Atwood is a celebrated Canadian author with numerous award-winning titles under her literary belt. Almost as an aside to my ‘trying to read new authors’ I am really trying to read more ‘new FEMALE’ authors, since I recently realized that apart from J.K. Rowling…. I have read almost none.

‘Ten days after the war ended, my sister Laura drove a car off a bridge.’ The novel starts off with this explosive sentence, and the rest of the novel is the slow delicate process of re-assembling the scattered pieces of the story leading up to that first blast. The largest portion of the novel focuses on the auto-biographical account of Iris Chase, a now elderly woman detailing the history of her and her sister Laura’s complicated relationship. Through her story, we are shown various chapters of Laura’s novel ‘The Blind Assassin’, a story about anonymous lovers conducting a secret affair, which rose to acclaim after the sisters tragic death. Within Laura's novel we are given a thrilling futuristic sci-fi story told by the nameless male to his devoted lover about a ‘blind assassin’ who falls in love with his intended target… a young damaged girl.

"Touch comes before sight, before speech. It is the first language and the last, and it always tells the truth."

The Blind Assassin is meta-fiction at it’s finest, however the beginning can feel a bit disjointed as we are introduced to multiple story layers. This un-comfortableness wears off quickly though as the story progresses and we begin to see the way that the seemingly non-related stories starting to reflect one another both in form and in plot. Small fragments of each story show up in it’s counterparts, giving the entire novel a connected fluid feel, each part working to enhance the substance of the others. If you ever have seen the movie ‘The Fountain’ I wouldn’t be surprised if you found similarities between the film and this story. Both involve 3 separate but intrinsically related stories, working together to tell a much grander story. The idea of interweaving stories is nothing new, but the way Atwood organizes her layers is truly innovative.

"In Paradise there are no stories, because there are no journeys. It's loss and regret and misery and yearning that drive the story forward, along its twisted road."

While reading this book it was easy to see why Atwood has risen to such approbation. Her writing is truly ‘crafted’ in a way that only a true talent could pull off. The complicated structure of the story is reflected in the intricate construction of her sentences, each word picked carefully and used with vigilance. I probably could have highlighted the entire book at the rate I started off at.

My only critique of this book is that I was personally so engrossed by the ‘story’ of the blind assassin, that I felt myself rushing to get to the brief points of the novel where his story is progressed forwards. So much of the work is devoted to Iris’s accounts of her and Laura’s childhood that I was becoming impatient to move past their part. However, to Atwood’s credit, what makes the minor characters so unforgettable is the slow account of the main story, giving form and meaning to the others.

Due to its complex nature, I feel that this is the kind of story that deserves multiple readings. Just by flipping back to copy my favorite quotes, I was surprised to notice subtle elements that had snuck it with out my knowledge, waiting for me to come back and find their poignant presence. It is hard to sum up a book that has so much going for it. It is even harder to sum up all of the thoughts that I had working through this title. I was intrigued, frustrated, intimidated, delighted, but above all impressed. From just this first title, I am confident in saying that Atwood is deserving of all the praise that she has received. I look forward to reading more from her.




Prongs 20th Review : The Blind Assassin

"He was deciding whether to cut her throat or love her forever. Right. Yes. The usual choices."

The Blind Assassin
Margaret Atwood

As a part of my ’52 books’ project for 2011, I am determined to read titles by authors that I am frankly embarrassed I have never made it too. Margaret Atwood was high up on that list, so I was beyond excited when ‘The Blind Assassin’ was drawn as my first book of the year. Atwood is a celebrated Canadian author with numerous award-winning titles under her literary belt. Almost as an aside to my ‘trying to read new authors’ I am really trying to read more ‘new FEMALE’ authors, since I recently realized that apart from J.K. Rowling…. I have read almost none.

‘Ten days after the war ended, my sister Laura drove a car off a bridge.’ The novel starts off with this explosive sentence, and the rest of the novel is the slow delicate process of re-assembling the scattered pieces of the story leading up to that first blast. The largest portion of the novel focuses on the auto-biographical account of Iris Chase, a now elderly woman detailing the history of her and her sister Laura’s complicated relationship. Through her story, we are shown various chapters of Laura’s novel ‘The Blind Assassin’, a story about anonymous lovers conducting a secret affair, which rose to acclaim after the sisters tragic death. Within Laura's novel we are given a thrilling futuristic sci-fi story told by the nameless male to his devoted lover about a ‘blind assassin’ who falls in love with his intended target… a young damaged girl.

"Touch comes before sight, before speech. It is the first language and the last, and it always tells the truth."

The Blind Assassin is meta-fiction at it’s finest, however the beginning can feel a bit disjointed as we are introduced to multiple story layers. This un-comfortableness wears off quickly though as the story progresses and we begin to see the way that the seemingly non-related stories starting to reflect one another both in form and in plot. Small fragments of each story show up in it’s counterparts, giving the entire novel a connected fluid feel, each part working to enhance the substance of the others. If you ever have seen the movie ‘The Fountain’ I wouldn’t be surprised if you found similarities between the film and this story. Both involve 3 separate but intrinsically related stories, working together to tell a much grander story. The idea of interweaving stories is nothing new, but the way Atwood organizes her layers is truly innovative.

"In Paradise there are no stories, because there are no journeys. It's loss and regret and misery and yearning that drive the story forward, along its twisted road."

While reading this book it was easy to see why Atwood has risen to such approbation. Her writing is truly ‘crafted’ in a way that only a true talent could pull off. The complicated structure of the story is reflected in the intricate construction of her sentences, each word picked carefully and used with vigilance. I probably could have highlighted the entire book at the rate I started off at.

My only critique of this book is that I was personally so engrossed by the ‘story’ of the blind assassin, that I felt myself rushing to get to the brief points of the novel where his story is progressed forwards. So much of the work is devoted to Iris’s accounts of her and Laura’s childhood that I was becoming impatient to move past their part. However, to Atwood’s credit, what makes the minor characters so unforgettable is the slow account of the main story, giving form and meaning to the others.

Due to its complex nature, I feel that this is the kind of story that deserves multiple readings. Just by flipping back to copy my favorite quotes, I was surprised to notice subtle elements that had snuck it with out my knowledge, waiting for me to come back and find their poignant presence. It is hard to sum up a book that has so much going for it. It is even harder to sum up all of the thoughts that I had working through this title. I was intrigued, frustrated, intimidated, delighted, but above all impressed. From just this first title, I am confident in saying that Atwood is deserving of all the praise that she has received. I look forward to reading more from her.




Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Tat Tuesday - Mark Twain


'Hey there Marauders!! It's our favorite time of the week once again!!
For those of you who are new to the site here's a bit of background. Tattoo Tuesday was started by our good friend Tara over at 25HourBooks and celebrates our love of literature plus the people like us who are obsessed enough to ink something literary on their body! Every week we feature a literary tattoo that interests or compels us. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ink.

This week's tattoo comes from Amy from Contrariwise.org

Here's what she had to say about her tattoo, which is from Life on the Mississippi by mark Twain:

"it helps me to let go of guilt i have from the past, as well as not freak out about what is to come. i am a teacher. teaching is a wonderful profession, but can also be quite stressful. i am very hard on myself at times, thinking i should do everything perfect the first time around. this helps to remind me that am i forever learning, along with my third grade students. i struggled with the font. originally i wanted to use ‘american typewriter’, but then went with my own handwriting to make it more personal… it looks as though i scribbled on my wrist with a sharpie, but i like that."



Alright folks, that is all for this Tuesday. Don't be too remiss, for we will return next and every Tuesday with a brand new literary tattoo for your viewing pleasure. We encourage every one to check out Tara's site as well, or even feel free to send us an e-mail with any tattoo's of your own!

Tat Tuesday - Mark Twain


'Hey there Marauders!! It's our favorite time of the week once again!!
For those of you who are new to the site here's a bit of background. Tattoo Tuesday was started by our good friend Tara over at 25HourBooks and celebrates our love of literature plus the people like us who are obsessed enough to ink something literary on their body! Every week we feature a literary tattoo that interests or compels us. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ink.

This week's tattoo comes from Amy from Contrariwise.org

Here's what she had to say about her tattoo, which is from Life on the Mississippi by mark Twain:

"it helps me to let go of guilt i have from the past, as well as not freak out about what is to come. i am a teacher. teaching is a wonderful profession, but can also be quite stressful. i am very hard on myself at times, thinking i should do everything perfect the first time around. this helps to remind me that am i forever learning, along with my third grade students. i struggled with the font. originally i wanted to use ‘american typewriter’, but then went with my own handwriting to make it more personal… it looks as though i scribbled on my wrist with a sharpie, but i like that."



Alright folks, that is all for this Tuesday. Don't be too remiss, for we will return next and every Tuesday with a brand new literary tattoo for your viewing pleasure. We encourage every one to check out Tara's site as well, or even feel free to send us an e-mail with any tattoo's of your own!

Saturday, January 8, 2011

Very First Video Blog!!!!!

ohmahgawd video blog!?!?!

You heard right marauders! Padfoot and Prongs here bringing your our very first...very rough...yet very original VIDEOOOO BLOGGG.

Since we have been masked in darkness for 2 years now, we thought it was time to show you all our mischievous faces and talk about our new obsession

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Below you will find our brand new Vlog, hot off the presses. In the brief clip we show off some of the graphic novel titles that have been recommended to us, and a few titles that we have found ourselves. The ones mentioned include:

Death Note - Tsugumi Ohba (technically a manga)
Sandman Series - Neil Gaiman
Watchmen - Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons
Sin City - Frank Miller
Mr. Punch - Neil Gaiman, Dave Mckean
The Twilight Zone graphic novels - Mark Kneece

We would love to hear some comments on what other titles to pick up, as well as thoughts on the ones that we already have. WARNING: THE AUDIO IS A BIT OFF.... SORRY WE HAVE NO IDEA WHY




Hope you enjoyed this nice little clip of your favorite marauders.... we hope to bring you lots more (and lots more thought out ones) in the future!!

-mischief DEFINITELY managed -


Very First Video Blog!!!!!

ohmahgawd video blog!?!?!

You heard right marauders! Padfoot and Prongs here bringing your our very first...very rough...yet very original VIDEOOOO BLOGGG.

Since we have been masked in darkness for 2 years now, we thought it was time to show you all our mischievous faces and talk about our new obsession

GRAPHIC NOVELS

Below you will find our brand new Vlog, hot off the presses. In the brief clip we show off some of the graphic novel titles that have been recommended to us, and a few titles that we have found ourselves. The ones mentioned include:

Death Note - Tsugumi Ohba (technically a manga)
Sandman Series - Neil Gaiman
Watchmen - Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons
Sin City - Frank Miller
Mr. Punch - Neil Gaiman, Dave Mckean
The Twilight Zone graphic novels - Mark Kneece

We would love to hear some comments on what other titles to pick up, as well as thoughts on the ones that we already have. WARNING: THE AUDIO IS A BIT OFF.... SORRY WE HAVE NO IDEA WHY




Hope you enjoyed this nice little clip of your favorite marauders.... we hope to bring you lots more (and lots more thought out ones) in the future!!

-mischief DEFINITELY managed -


Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Tattoo Tuesday


Hey there Marauders!! It's our favorite time of the week once again!!
For those of you who are new to the site here's a bit of background. Tattoo Tuesday was started by our good friend Tara over at 25HourBooks and celebrates our love of literature plus the people like us who are obsessed enough to ink something literary on their body! Every week we feature a literary tattoo that interests or compels us. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ink.

This week we have a tattoo from a Peter Pan lover. Padfoot is extremely jealous of this week's tattoo!

From LiveJournal:



"I spent my entire childhood being totally enamored of the story of Peter Pan. I read the original until the book fell apart, and I took in every single media representation of the Pan story I could find. This persisted into my teenage years, and I never really got over the magic of it all.

So today I started a Peter Pan themed tattoo. It's Captain Hook's ship The Jolly Roger, as depicted in the Disney movie version of the story. I know that Disney sort of bastardized the story, but it was the first exposure to it that I had, and I think that has to count for something.

We're finished with the outlines now, and in two months or so I'm going to get the colors all filled in. My artist is pretty amazing though, and I tend to think that she is able to make even in-between work look like finished designs. "


http://community.livejournal.com/literarytattoos/900205.html#cutid1




Alright folks, that is all for this Tuesday. Don't be too remiss, for we will return next and every Tuesday with a brand new literary tattoo for your viewing pleasure. We encourage every one to check out Tara's site as well, or even feel free to send us an e-mail with any tattoo's of your own!